5 no-cook summer suppers

Health

Smoked Salmon and Horseradish Tartines
Salmon is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help support heart health. These “tartines” (a French open-faced sandwich) use smoked salmon, giving you all the benefits of omega-3s without the unpleasantness of having to turn on an oven on hot summer nights. 

Serves 4 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons softened butter
  • 1½ teaspoons horseradish (or more, if desired) 
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 16 slices Italian bread, cut diagonally 
  • 1 English cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 pound thinly sliced smoked salmon 
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon chopped dill or chives

Directions
In a small bowl, add softened butter, horseradish, and pepper. Mix until well combined. Lay the bread slices on a large platter. Spread each piece with a light layer of the horseradish butter. Top with cucumber slices and then the smoked salmon. Zest about one-quarter of the lemon over the tartines and garnish with herbs before serving.   


Asian Rice Noodle Salad With Shrimp and Herbs 
Cilantro and mint give this salad a refreshing flavor that’s perfect for hot, humid nights. And although this dish feels light, it’s sure to satisfy your hunger, thanks to protein-rich shrimp, which also provides vitamins D and B12 as well as minerals zinc and selenium. 

Serves 4

Ingredients 

  • ½ (16-ounce) package thin rice noodles
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil 
  • 1½ tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon red chili flakes (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder 
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 pound cleaned and peeled large cooked shrimp
  • ½ pound snow peas, chopped
  • 1 cup shredded carrots 
  • 1½ cups chopped cilantro
  • ½ cup chopped mint 

Directions
In a large heatproof bowl, add the rice noodles and fully cover with hot water. Let sit until noodles are softened, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, add honey, sesame oil, soy sauce, rice vinegar, chili flakes, garlic powder, salt and pepper; whisk together until combined. When noodles are softened, drain in a colander. Add drained noodles to a large bowl with dressing; stir to combine. Add shrimp, snow peas, carrots, cilantro, and mint. Stir again to combine and serve. 


Panzanella Salad With White Beans and Tuna 
This traditional Italian bread salad goes from side-dish status to main course with the addition of cannellini beans and tuna. Beans are fiber-rich and nutrient-dense, while tuna is a great source of lean protein. 

Serves 4 

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 medium tomatoes, cut into wedges 
  • 1 (15.5-ounce) can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 (6.3-oz. pouches) or 3 (4-oz. cans) chunk light tuna in water, drained and flaked 
  • ¼ cup pitted Kalamata olives, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large handful basil leaves 
  • 3 cups bite-sized bread cubes (preferably from day-old firm bread, like French or Italian)

Directions
In a large bowl, add the mustard, salt, pepper, and vinegar. Use a fork to whisk it together as you slowly add the olive oil. Then, in the bowl, add tomatoes, beans, tuna, olives, and basil. Mix together to combine. Stir in the bread cubes. If desired, let the salad sit for 15 to 20 minutes before serving to allow the bread to absorb the dressing.

Gazpacho With Prosciutto Toast
Tomatoes are a delicious way to add a dose of vitamins C and A to your diet. You can certainly use fresh in-season tomatoes, but canned tomatoes are a great shortcut. With the addition of simple prosciutto toasts, this refreshing soup is dinner-worthy. Serve the gazpacho at room temperature, or let it chill in the fridge for one to two hours prior to serving. 

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 (28-ounce) can fire-roasted whole peeled tomatoes 
  • 1 cup reduced-fat Greek yogurt
  • 2 medium cucumbers, peeled and chopped
  • 2 scallions, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 8 thick baguette slices
  • 8 slices prosciutto 
  • 1 avocado, diced 

Directions
In a large blender, combine the tomatoes, yogurt, cucumbers, scallions, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Puree until smooth (about two minutes). Taste, adjusting seasonings if needed. Arrange the baguette slices on a platter; top each bread slice with a piece of prosciutto. Pour the gazpacho into bowls and garnish with diced avocado. Serve. 


Zucchini Noodles With Beans, Ham, and Red Pepper Vinaigrette 
Raw zucchini noodles are a smart substitute for boiled pasta on hot evenings. You get to skip the fuss of cooking, plus you’ll slash carbs and calories while adding a healthy dose of fiber and vitamins. 

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 3 medium zucchinis
  • 1 whole roasted red pepper or 1 cup chopped roasted red pepper
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 (10-ounce) package frozen corn, completely thawed
  • 1 (7-ounce) ham steak, chopped    
  • 1 (15.5-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (15.5-ounce) can kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved

Directions
Trim the ends of each zucchini. Using a spiralizer according to its directions, make the zucchini into noodles. If you don’t have a spiralizer, use a box grater to finely grate the zucchini, or use a peeler to make zucchini ribbons. Put the zucchini in a large bowl. Next, make the dressing by combining the roasted red pepper, olive oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper in the bowl of a food processor. Puree until smooth (about one minute). Stir salad dressing into the zucchini noodles, then let them sit to absorb for about five minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients and mix together before serving.

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